About South Indian Foods

A typical Tamil meal consists of many spicy and non-spicy dishes. Many of these dishes are generally mixed and eaten with steamed rice, which is the staple food of the region. Except for Brahmins and a couple of non-Brahmin castes, most Tamilians eat non-vegetarian food. However, on a typical day, a Tamil family will eat mostly vegetarian food, and the intake of meat is lower than in most parts of the world.

Tamil cuisine groups dishes under five slightly overlapping categories.

The cuisines of Andhra are the spiciest in all of India. Generous use of chili powder and tamarind make the dishes tangy and hot. The majority of a diverse variety of dishes are vegetable- or lentil-based.

Karnataka cuisine is very diverse. Described as the mildest in terms of spice content of the five southern states’ cuisines, there is a generous use of jaggery, palm sugar and little use of chili powder however Northern Karnataka cuisine, which can be extremely hot, is an exception. Since the percentage of vegetarians in Karnataka is higher than other southern states, vegetarian food enjoys widespread popularity.

 

Kerala cuisine is very diverse, a diversity is best classified on the basis of the various communities. The Syrian Christian dishes and Malabari Muslim dishes are famous. Since Kerala’s main export is coconuts,{fact} almost all of the dishes, irrespective of the variety in the cuisines of the different communities, have coconuts associated with them, either in the form of shavings or oil extracted from the nut. Seafood is also very popular in the coastal regions and eaten almost every day.

One of the things that people find intimidating about cooking Indian food is the vast array of spices used — both whole and ground, which are often combined into complex spice mixes. However, having taught classes on Indian food, I find that as soon as people are able to identify and understand the spices we use, then suddenly they find this cuisine is not as hard to make after all.

Here are the 11 spices I reach for most often when cooking Indian food and how I use them!

Using Indian Spices

Most spices, with some exceptions – notably, nutmeg – are dry-roasted to release their essential oils before being ground into spice mixes. While some spices can be blended using a mortar and pestle, I normally recommend the use of a spice grinder or powerful blender to make sure your mixes are finely ground, especially because some spices, like cassia bark, are very hard and tough to blend down to a fine powder.

 

South India Bazaar – SIB

We here have our own brand SIB – the following are the spices what we call is hot sale

1.Sambar Masala

2. Rasam Masala

3. Idli Powder

4. Chetinadu Curry Masala

5. Fish Curry Masala